McDonald's

McDonald’s cutting single-use plastics in Canadian restaurants

McDonald’s Canada has announced it will introduce wooden cutlery, wooden stir sticks, and paper straws to its 1,400+ restaurants across the country by December 2021.

A press release notes the removal of these single-use plastics in its restaurants supports McDonald’s global commitment to source 100 per cent of McDonald’s primary guest packaging from renewable, recycled, or certified sources.

The plastics removed will include all products that are used to package guest food on premises at McDonald’s restaurants, including containers, cups, wraps, bags for food, drink carriers, napkins and Happy Meal boxes.

Wooden stir sticks are currently being rolled out in restaurants with wooden cutlery and paper straws to follow starting in October, with the “last plastic straw” expected to be used in December 2021.

McFlurry’s plastic spoons, however, will remain in use.

McDonald’s Canada estimates that by removing plastic cutlery, stir sticks, and straws from its restaurants, it will remove approximately 840 tons of plastics from the Canadian system annually.

“By being part of the Canadian fabric and serving close to three million guests every day across more than 1,400 restaurants, McDonald’s Canada is playing an important role in the ongoing reduction of single-use plastics in the country”, says Rob Dick, Supply Chain Officer, McDonald’s Canada. “By removing these single-use plastics in our restaurants, we show our ongoing commitment to minimize our environmental footprint and to help protect the planet for future generations. “

RELATED: Canadian foodservice is well-placed to embrace the federal single-use plastic ban

McDonald’s isn’t the only major large-scale retailer in Canada to announce a commitment to ditching plastic recently.

Starbucks has introduced strawless lids for cold drinks and replaced plastic straws with paper ones, while Tim Hortons has cut the use of plastic straws and made food wrappers paper-based instead of plastic-lined so they’re 100 per cent recyclable.

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